Boris Talpã, judge and head of the Legal Advice Centre at the National Institute of Justice; Vlad Clima, a judge at the Court of Appeal in Chişinău and a member of the board of the Moldovan Association of Judges; Ellen Hahne, IRZ; Stefanie Wulff, Presiding Judge at the Regional Court of Bremen; Dr. Silke Noltensmeier, a public prosecutor at the Public Prosecutor's Office in Bremen; Prof. Dr. Jan Bockemühl, a lawyer/specialist lawyer in criminal law from Regensburg (from left to right)
Boris Talpã, judge and head of the Legal Advice Centre at the National Institute of Justice; Vlad Clima, a judge at the Court of Appeal in Chişinău and a member of the board of the Moldovan Association of Judges; Ellen Hahne, IRZ; Stefanie Wulff, Presiding Judge at the Regional Court of Bremen; Dr. Silke Noltensmeier, a public prosecutor at the Public Prosecutor's Office in Bremen; Prof. Dr. Jan Bockemühl, a lawyer/specialist lawyer in criminal law from Regensburg (from left to right)

On 2 and 3 November 2017, the IRZ in partnership with the National Institute of Justice of the Republic of Moldova and the Moldovan Association of Judges, organised a second Criminal Law Moot Court in Chişinău.

The objective of the two-day Moot Court seminar was to provide the opportunity for an intense, practice-oriented exchange on how criminal proceedings work, which was enhanced still further thanks to interaction through role play. The focus of the seminar was on appraising evidence.

There were a total of 52 participants, most of whom were judges, but there were also many public prosecutors, lawyers and a few investigators. The seminar was opened by Vlad Clima, a judge at the Court of Appeal in Chişinău and a member of the board of the Moldovan Association of Judges, as well as by Boris Talpã, a judge and head of the Legal Advice Centre at the National Institute of Justice.

The experts taking part in the Moot Court were Stefanie Wulff, Presiding Judge at the Regional Court of Bremen, Dr. Silke Noltensmeier, a public prosecutor at the Public Prosecutor's Office in Bremen, and Prof. Dr. Jan Bockemühl, a lawyer/specialist lawyer in criminal law from Regensburg.

Following an introductory lecture on the role of judges, public prosecutors and lawyers in criminal proceedings in Germany, participants were shown how criminal proceedings work, using a case with a German solution. The subsequent lively discussions and exchanges on the differences and similarities between the German and Moldovan systems were continued on the second day of the seminar with a mock procedure using a different case with a Moldovan solution. The participants benefited a great deal from the opportunity to exchange views with experienced practitioners.

A continuation of the Moot Court is planned for next year, following the extremely positive feedback from the participants and in view of the great demand for learning about the different approaches within the German system.