Visit of the guests at the German Association of Judges: Snezana Andrejevic, Vice-President of the Supreme Court of Serbia (3rd from right) and Dragana Boljevic, Chairwoman of the Serbian Association of Judges (far right)Visit of the guests at the German Association of Judges: Snezana Andrejevic, Vice-President of the Supreme Court of Serbia (3rd from right) and Dragana Boljevic, Chairwoman of the Serbian Association of Judges (far right)

The IRZ has very good networks with its domestic project partners as well as with foreign and international organisations in South East Europe operating in the field of law thanks to its long-term work in this region. This regularly gives rise to synergy effects, of which we like to make use. A good example is the working visit of judges from the Supreme Court of Serbia which dealt with the standardisation of case law and post-university legal training. This visit was organised by the OSCE Mission in Serbia and the IRZ and took place in Berlin from 26 to 29 April 2015.

The comprehensive programme started at the Federal Ministry of Justice with an introduction to the various legal regulations and practical exercises on the standardisation of case law. Furthermore, there was a presentation regarding the distribution of competences for legal training in the German federal system and the Ausbildung zum Einheitsjuristen (same training for all legal professions), followed by expert talks at the German Association of Judges and an all-day visit to the Higher Regional Court of Berlin with several items on the agenda. The delegation, among them the Vice-President of the Supreme Court of Serbia, Ms Snezana Andrejevic, and the President of the Serbian Association of Judges, Ms Dragana Boljevic, were received by the President of the Higher Regional Court of Berlin, Ms Monika Nöhre.

The Serbian guests returned with a wealth of inspiration and useful information, such as the upcoming nationwide introduction of the electronic justice system in Serbia. Due to the fact that this process will need a couple of years of preparation, also in Germany, which has much better resources, it became clear that certain timeframes need to be questioned as regards the current reforms in Serbia. This also applies to the introduction of a new law. The introduction of the special law in Germany as a consequence of reunification, for example, took quite a while until controversial issues were settled by case law in a uniform way. This is why the corresponding steps will certainly take some time in Serbia as well.